Mining my experience of navigating a fluid identity throughout a long-term partnership with my husband that began when we were fifteen, I flip traditional gender roles in portraiture. I invite the audience into vulnerable moments in my marriage, providing an empowered female voice that questions; asking where societal expectations and identity construction dangerously collide and what it means to exist as a person only ever evolving through another. I purposefully use textile techniques for their use by female activist groups, their embodiment of domestic memories, and metaphorical manifestation of two threads/reeds/grids entangled together to make a whole. Projecting fantasies and fever dreams onto mundane domestic situations, I complicate the perceived ideal of how a life should be organized. Saturated in the uncanny, furniture and figure seem to disorient one another prompting the viewer to reconsider what was once overlooked. 

           In the series, “I think I married the back of your head, at least it doesn’t yell much,” I consider those passive and dissociated moments in my relationship when my mind is allowed to wander. Without previous real partners to compare to, Jordan is cast into revealing and sometimes problematic fantastical roles drawn from movies, imaginings and characters encountered throughout the routine of life. Sensuous paint, rounded protruding surfaces that just don’t seem to fit together perfectly and humorous yarn that mimics familiar objects all act as motifs to an ongoing lived experience.